Media Kits for Non-Profits

Sample Media Kit for Non-Profits

Sample Media Kit for Non-Profits

A strategically executed PR campaign can help non-profits achieve national and international attention for their causes. It can also help attract well known personalities to become fundraising champions, exceed fundraising goals, increase event attendance and create more volunteer opportunities. Working in conjunction with a social media content strategy, PR has the ability to help a campaign go viral, consistently growing the number of donations, year after year.

So how do you get started?  Part of being sufficiently prepared for a media campaign and establishing positive relationships with the media, is making sure that you have all the proper materials in a centralized location for each campaign. Directing media to a centralized hub for information will make it easier to handle media requests and make the story pitching process move more seamlessly.

Building a media kit doesn’t have to be extremely expensive or time-consuming. Before you spend a lot of time and energy creating news releases for each campaign, let me show you how to put together an effective media kit and how to put it to good use.

 

Pay Attention to Where Your Network of Supporters Congregate

Today, many journalists, bloggers and other media members will undoubtedly have a social media network on various channels. Chances are your network of supporters have their own audiences through social media as well, so why not tap into that? If you give your donors, volunteers and the media the right tools, they’ll relay your news for you to their Facebook fans, LinkedIn connections, Instagram followers and YouTube subscribers.

Rather than creating bland blocks of text with quotes from key personnel, give journalists the key points, visuals and ideas in highly shareable formats such as infographics, videos and slideshows. It’s a great way to extend the life of re-useable organic content that focuses on your cause. The goal is to make it as easy as possible for your network and journalists to share news of a campaign or event, so here are some pieces to share with them to make it as easy as possible.

 

Jazz Up the Executive Bios

Instead of creating bullet point bios for key personnel in your non-profit, why not feature some short video clips where the key team members introduce themselves and talk about what inspires them about your cause? Post the videos (and high resolution head shots, just in case) in a centralized location. It could be on your website’s media page or a separate mini-site just for your exclusive media kit.

 

Share a Timeline of Your Non-Profit’s Highlights

Sample Non-Profit Infographic

Sample Non-Profit Infographic

Instead of writing a drawn-out executive summary of your non-profit’s history, why not turn that timeline into a more interactive slideshow or infographic? You can showcase highlights in your history such as your first fundraising event or the largest donation you’ve ever received-with eye-catching designs-and track how many people view your slideshow/infographic. So not only do you have a visually interactive piece for your media kit, the built-in analytics will also show you how journalists and your supporters interact with it.

 

Make Sure High-Resolution Logos & Branded Materials are Easily Accessible

Sample Non-Profit Logo

Sample Non-Profit Logo

Any high resolution versions of your logo and other branded materials such as posters & mobile optimized images should be easily accessible for downloading and sharing purposes online.

 

Videos & Photos Are Essential to Letting People See How Your Cause Works

Fundraising Event

Fundraising Event

Photos and videos that focus on your fundraising events as well as press interviews can really give your supporters and journalists a great sense of how your organization works and how passionate you are. You can include easy-to-share buttons as well as branded hashtags for your supporters, making it easy for them to share them via Instagram, Twitter, Facebook or LinkedIn as well as YouTube. Journalists will get an idea of the kind of press you’ve received and what stories about your cause are the most popular.

 

Sample Social Media Posts

Sample Non-Profit Instagram Post

Sample Non-Profit Instagram Post

Provide supporters with sample social media posts for Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn or YouTube about your latest campaign or initiative. Include easy-to-understand prompts for sharing, provide a branded hashtag with each post and encourage supporters to share it in their own personal style. Use one of the social listening tools (mentioned in a previous post) to track how the hashtag is being used and thank those who share the posts.

 

Create Infographics

Non-Profit Infographics

Non-Profit Infographics

If you’re sharing new research or releasing new information (ie. increase in donations, number of volunteers etc.) consider using one of the infographic tools (mentioned in a previous post) to create eye-catching and easy to read infographics for your supporters to share via their own networks. Infographics make research much more compelling to read and journalists can pull statistics from them to use in tweets, status updates and posts on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

Share Blog Posts

Non-Profit Blog Post

Non-Profit Blog Post

If any of your supporters have blogs, you might want to consider giving them a list of ideas for sample posts about your organization or providing a select few with a guest post that they can share with their audiences. Even better, you can share the links to your blog posts as part of your sample social media posts, making it even easier for your network of supporters to share posts.

Make sure you display all these important elements of your media kit on a prominent page on your website-and keep the prompts for sharing the content easy to find, read and understand.

Subscribe here for more great insights on non-profit social media marketing, public relations, content curation and fundraising ideas!

 

Lilian Sue is a marketing communications professional with over 10 years of experience developing integrated multi-channel marketing campaigns (copywriting, social media & PR/media relations) for lifestyle brands, indie film & television projects, B2B companies, tourism/hospitality & food/beverage brands. Learn more about her work at In Retrospect Writing Services.

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Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.meltwater.com

CASE STUDY: Unit Publicity and Media Relations Campaign for Short Horror Film Heartless

Heartless Poster

 

THE CHALLENGE

 As a unit publicist with experience running public relations campaigns for short films, an actor at a film festival and a horror film moving through a competition, this film presented challenges I hadn’t previously dealt with in my other projects. For my other short films, I’d had the benefit of support through the film event I was working on (see my Crazy 8s case study) or it was a one-off event such as the TIFF strategy for Peter Dacunha or helping Black Land through the Cinecoup competition.

Heartless is my first American-directed and produced short horror film where I didn’t have a film event, competition or team behind me as a jumping off point and a sense of urgency to make the publicity campaign flow easier. Heartless, and by extension, the film’s award-winning production company, Sunshine Boy Productions, also has the distinction of being the first film I’d actively pursued for publicity.

An unintended benefit of this being my first major solo unit publicity campaign, however, was the ease in obtaining film reviews where it had previously been difficult for my other film projects. Not only did the fact that Heartless is a horror film make it much easier to obtain reviews, Kevin & Jennifer Sluder, the film’s director & executive producer (and owners of Sunshine Boy Productions) have also been readily available for interviews as the production company is their primary business, rather than a side venture.

THE SOLUTION

Focusing on local media (newspapers, magazines, blogs), indie film podcasts, blogs and horror review outlets, I updated my media database based on the region the film was screening at on the festival circuit. As a result, I was able to pitch Heartless to countless local media in regions such as Lansing, MI, Durham, NC, Calgary, Alberta and the greater Los Angeles area.

In addition, I was also able to pitch interviews and reviews for Heartless with numerous horror and indie film media outlets worldwide such as Ready, Steady, Cut out of the UK, Rue Morgue Magazine out of Toronto, Canada, Promote Horror out of the US, Dave Bullis’s Indie Film podcast out of the US and Popcorn Horror out of Scotland.

For results and subsequent press coverage, please read my Case Studies and see my Unit Publicity Portfolio for more project examples.

CASE STUDY: Unit Publicity & Media Relations Campaign for Season 3 of APTN’s Moosemeat & Marmalade

THE CHALLENGE

As the unit publicist for APTN’s third season of the Indigenous cooking series, Moosemeat & Marmalade, this production stood out from my other indie film projects for a few reasons. 1) It would be my first time doing publicity for a TV series, 2) It would also be my first time promoting Indigenous food culture and 3) As a recurring client of The Social Agency (a boutique PR agency I do contract work for), they’d already established press coverage from numerous outlets across Canada for the past two seasons that saw the show increase in popularity.

So as the new publicist coming into the project, I had both the added benefit & challenge of pitching Canadian media coast to coast as well as trying to establish new story angles for a series that had already covered a lot of ground over two seasons. Additionally, I didn’t want to just obtain press coverage from outlets already familiar with the TV series, the goal was to expand coverage to reach completely new audiences.

There was also the media relations strategy between the outlets and the two co-hosts; Cree bush cook/Indigenous rights activist Art Napoleon and UK born Chef Dan Hayes, owner of The London Chef Cooking School, to consider.

THE SOLUTION

 Focusing on story angles such as the first-ever gleaned Vegetarian Chili recipe (meaning it used leftover crops after the harvest) and Indigenous food culture and sovereignty, I pitched several mainstream major city newspapers, blogs and radio stations across Canada.

As the TV series also filmed in several locations on the Gulf Islands, Vancouver Island, Northwest Territories and overseas in the UK, I pitched the story angles to publications, radio stations and blogs located in these specific regions. Using the Indigenous food culture angle and Art’s passion for Indigenous food sovereignty and security, I was also able to secure interviews, coverage and recipes in Indigenous radio shows, newspapers and websites.

For the results & press coverage received, please go to Case Studies, where you’ll also find my other film & lifestyle PR campaigns. For more project examples, please check out my Unit Publicity Portfolio.